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Ask a REAL Con.Ed Student 2011-2012 Options ▼
qzqzkej
#21 Posted : Monday, October 24, 2011 9:20:15 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 10/24/2011
Posts: 1
Hi, I'm currently in grade 12, and am thinking of applying to queen's concurrent ed!

I just heard lots of good things about Queen's, and it's been my dream to get there since grade 10 and stuff.

My average is about 95-96, it might go down after this year's done,

but my counsellor said Queen's would definitely want to accept you, but

it's good to have a back-up plan by applying to one other place.

So I was considering, but I'm not sure if I should.

I need scholarship and stuff, so I also need to apply for those when I'm applying to other place, too.

I'm quite all confused and I needed some help/ advice!


Please reply~:)

Thank you

Fawlkes
#22 Posted : Monday, October 24, 2011 10:15:00 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/26/2011
Posts: 69
Hi qzqzkej

While your average is impressive, I have to caution you, it might not be enough. While we have been saying that it is possible to get into Queen's Con-Ed without marks like yours, it is equally possible to NOT get in WITH marks like yours. So Queen's would not "deffinetly" want to accept you. That's why you have to write a PSE. Queen's wants to know that you are a well rounded person.

Meaning you DEFINETLY need a back-up plan. Remember that OUAC (I'm assuming you're from Ontario) lets you apply to three programs at no extra cost, so research other schools or programs you might be interested in. So in reality, you need two back-up plans.

In terms of scholarships, most schools will automatically consider you for entrance scholarships. For instance, if you apply to Trent and get in with an average over 90%, tuitition is free. Queen's offers $2000 for a 90%+ and $4000 for a 95%+ provided you get in. Other schools have similar scholarships. So while it seems like a lot of work to apply for scholarships at three different schools, its really not. The exception, of course, is major entrance awards, but even then, that's only one extra application per school.

Most scholarships that you have to apply directly to are not school specific. And luckily for you, this website is a great resource for finding ones to apply to!

If scholarships are important to you, I would strongly recomment looking at the Trent/Queen's Con-Ed program, as Trent is very generous with scholarships, and don't be afraid to look at other schools to. My best advice to you: try not to get too caught up in the Queen's hype just based on what you have heard, there is a lot more to any university and most importantly remember NOTHING IS GARUNTEED! Good luck, and if you have any other questions or want clarification, please, ask away!
QUEEN'S CON-ED CLASS OF 2015
Ba Ba Blue
#23 Posted : Tuesday, October 25, 2011 1:05:41 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
Hey qzqzkej!

As Fawlkes said, your grades are great. Don't be ashamed to flaunt them, but also don't be overconfident that Queen's will accept you. I have heard of people with 97% averages not getting in. Queen's wants to produce good teachers and being a good learner yourself is only half of what it takes.

As Fawlkes said, the con.ed program at Trent that is actually joint with Queen's sounds like it would be a good alternative for you. By going into Trent, you'd get your entire Trent tuition paid for and you'd still eventually end up at Queen's (to me that was a win-win - I wasn't rejecting Queen's, nor was I missing out on some great financial relief). Remember that it's the EXACT same program offered at two campuses. Of course, there are some unique aspects of Trent that some people love and some people don't (mostly related to geography), so I highly recommend coming to see the campus for yourself. In fact, Trent's open house will be on November 5 so you should definitely come check it out.

Since both Queen's and Queen's-Trent base decision off grades and PSE, I would also take a look at universities for which your marks will guarantee you acceptance. A good example is Nipissing, which also offers a free tuition scholarship and does not require a PSE.

Good luck on your quest to get into con.ed - it's a great program regardless of where you go, and you'll definitely be in one of the most exciting fields around when you graduate!
kris10toll
#24 Posted : Tuesday, November 08, 2011 3:05:15 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/8/2011
Posts: 2
Just wanted to say that I was posting on this thread as KristenT94, but problems with my account made me delete and rebuild it. So I'm still around!
Attending Brock University for a BA/BEd in Child and Youth Studies and Primary/Junior Education.[/center]
Ba Ba Blue
#25 Posted : Monday, November 21, 2011 11:07:43 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
Bumping this up to get more exposure. I feel like people aren't seeing this thread!
rtremb
#26 Posted : Tuesday, December 13, 2011 5:16:32 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/15/2011
Posts: 24
Ba Ba Blue: Do you know how many applicants there are each year for the Concurrent Education/Arts program at Queens please?
Ba Ba Blue
#27 Posted : Tuesday, December 13, 2011 9:23:27 AM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
I'm pretty sure it's around a thousand. Maybe more. The best bet is to ask them. I know for Queen's-Trent science and arts combined it's 1000 every year for sure.
rtremb
#28 Posted : Tuesday, December 13, 2011 1:12:45 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/15/2011
Posts: 24
We did ask when we went for a tour of the University last summer but no one was able to tell us. We also called later and still were unable to find out. Guess we'll call again.....
Fawlkes
#29 Posted : Friday, December 16, 2011 8:46:03 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/26/2011
Posts: 69
Hey rtemb, I'm in that program right now, and while I don't know how many applicants there are to arts specifically, I can tell you that there were about 2000 applicants to all Con-Ed programs (Arts, Science, Music and Computing) combined last year. Of those, probably a little more than half were for arts. There are 178 students in my year and just over 200 offers went out. Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any more questions. :)
QUEEN'S CON-ED CLASS OF 2015
rtremb
#30 Posted : Monday, December 19, 2011 11:26:23 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/15/2011
Posts: 24
Thank you for the reply. That's a lot of applicants for only a few spaces!! Do you have any pointers on what it takes to stand out in the crowd? My daughter's average is 94-95% with a full eight subject Grade 12 course load but from what I am reading on here having high grades is not necessarily enough..... She's wanted to be a teacher for a number of years now - probably math as her main teachable.
Ba Ba Blue
#31 Posted : Tuesday, December 20, 2011 1:02:32 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
Good grades are a good start. Other than being able to drop her two lowest marks, taking a full course load is irrelevant to them.

They also like seeing long-term leadership roles and dedication to causes. If she hasn't done anything in that department already, it's probably too late seeing as she's already in grade 12. They also like seeing people with interests that aren't purely academic - someone who goes beyond just "making it through" life. The most common experiences people include in the PSEs include working at a camp, student council and co-op placements.

My advice to people filling out PSEs is not to undervalue any experiences. The way I see it, there must be something that has brought your daughter to want to be a teacher. The important thing is to focus on those experiences, even if they may seem like irrelevant experiences to her. The fact that they actually made an impact to her will come out in her writing and the passion will show through to help her get accepted.

Another important thing for Queen's is not to sell yourself short. The Queen's-Trent Concurrent Education office publishes the following guide to help people fill out the PSE (which is exactly the same considering both programs are exactly the same, so they are looking for the same things): http://www.trentu.ca/edu...oncurrent/pdfs/pse.pdf. I highly suggest reading that over to see how to write the PSE. In addition, I recommend that your daughter lets an English teacher who she DOES NOT KNOW read her PSE. The reason for this is that the teacher won't have prior knowledge of your daughter's experiences (similar to how those reading her PSE don't know her) so they won't subconsciously fill in the blanks and will thus be able to give honest feedback to her.

There are a few factors that could help your daughter. First, with math as her major she's more likely to get in considering most of the aforementioned applicants are to the arts stream. Also, the deadline has passed for applying for the scholarship, but Queen's is known to give preference to those students who were nominated by their school for the Chancellor's scholarship. If your daughter is one of the lucky few who got nominated, that could help her too.

The final piece of advice I want to give is to make sure your daughter considers all her options. She may want Queen's as her top choice, but realistically she will be just as prepared for teaching regardless of where she goes. It's not like school boards give preference to one program over the other. The difference in determining whether you get a job in teaching is more of who you know than where you went. Queen's does offer some really good professional development experiences throughout the year, but you don't even have to go there to take advantage of some of the bigger ones (for example, I'm attending the Queen's Conference on Education in January).

If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask. I can assure you that your daughter is well on her way to becoming a teacher regardless of where she ends up!
rtremb
#32 Posted : Wednesday, December 21, 2011 1:30:13 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/15/2011
Posts: 24
Ba Ba Blue wrote:
Good grades are a good start. Other than being able to drop her two lowest marks, taking a full course load is irrelevant to them.

They also like seeing long-term leadership roles and dedication to causes. If she hasn't done anything in that department already, it's probably too late seeing as she's already in grade 12. They also like seeing people with interests that aren't purely academic - someone who goes beyond just "making it through" life. The most common experiences people include in the PSEs include working at a camp, student council and co-op placements.

My advice to people filling out PSEs is not to undervalue any experiences. The way I see it, there must be something that has brought your daughter to want to be a teacher. The important thing is to focus on those experiences, even if they may seem like irrelevant experiences to her. The fact that they actually made an impact to her will come out in her writing and the passion will show through to help her get accepted.

Another important thing for Queen's is not to sell yourself short. The Queen's-Trent Concurrent Education office publishes the following guide to help people fill out the PSE (which is exactly the same considering both programs are exactly the same, so they are looking for the same things): http://www.trentu.ca/edu...oncurrent/pdfs/pse.pdf. I highly suggest reading that over to see how to write the PSE. In addition, I recommend that your daughter lets an English teacher who she DOES NOT KNOW read her PSE. The reason for this is that the teacher won't have prior knowledge of your daughter's experiences (similar to how those reading her PSE don't know her) so they won't subconsciously fill in the blanks and will thus be able to give honest feedback to her.

There are a few factors that could help your daughter. First, with math as her major she's more likely to get in considering most of the aforementioned applicants are to the arts stream. Also, the deadline has passed for applying for the scholarship, but Queen's is known to give preference to those students who were nominated by their school for the Chancellor's scholarship. If your daughter is one of the lucky few who got nominated, that could help her too.

The final piece of advice I want to give is to make sure your daughter considers all her options. She may want Queen's as her top choice, but realistically she will be just as prepared for teaching regardless of where she goes. It's not like school boards give preference to one program over the other. The difference in determining whether you get a job in teaching is more of who you know than where you went. Queen's does offer some really good professional development experiences throughout the year, but you don't even have to go there to take advantage of some of the bigger ones (for example, I'm attending the Queen's Conference on Education in January).

If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask. I can assure you that your daughter is well on her way to becoming a teacher regardless of where she ends up!


Thank you for the advice. Really appreciate that you started this thread.

The Universities may only look at the highest six Grade 12 courses however she has chosen to take eight academic Grade 12 courses because of her love of learning.

My daughter is tutoring math (3 students) and homework club (2-3 nights a week). She has done Camp Counselling at Golden Lake Camp. For work she babysits children of all ages (full-time in the summers). She also does a long list of charity fundraising activities every year. Hopefully these experiences will be considered good ones by Queens.

My father (her grandfather) was a Headmaster, her uncle is a headmaster and two of her aunts are teachers so there is a history of teaching in our family. She was inspired to become a teacher herself by her History Grade 10/11/12 High School teacher.

She did apply for the Major Admissions Awards but was not chosen by her school for the Chancellor's Award despite placing third in Grade 11 (there were at least three other students who were also applying from her school). Anyway, her application has been sent in based on financial need for the other Major Admission Awards. She found the link (I think you posted it) for the Trent PSE very helpful when she was writing the essays, etc. for this (thank you).

As you probably know, for the Concurrent Education program, Math is a considered an Arts subject at both Queens and Trent so she would still be competing with all the other applicants for an Arts place.
We are being told that there is a shortage of Math teachers so hopefully her desire to teach Math will help her get into Queens.

While Queens is her first choice she has also applied to Trent University Concurrent Education/Arts. She has also applied to Queens for the Bachelor of Arts Honours. She will also be applying to the University of Ottawa for a Bachelor of Arts Honours.
courtneymlotek
#33 Posted : Friday, December 30, 2011 2:34:11 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 10/5/2011
Posts: 1
I'm currently in grade 12 and I'm hoping to have about a 90% average when I apply (i.e. marks are sent in, I send in PSE) to this program, balancing a 9-course load all year (at a school that is known to be difficult).

While I feel that I'm not doing nearly as well as others who have posted in this forum, I have many extra-curriculars and leadership positions that I can use for PSE and which can stand out from many other applicants (or so I hope).

I have heard that after a certain grade average, Queen's begin to set all applicants as equal and then only base the rest off of extra-curriculars/PSEs. Is this true?
If it is, is 90% average too low?
And also, what I've been worried about the most: can extra-curriculars/PSEs ever out-weight grades or are grades most important?
Ba Ba Blue
#34 Posted : Friday, December 30, 2011 3:58:52 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
The grades and supplemental at Queen's are looked at together. There's really no saying which is more important, although finding people who got in with less than a 90% average is rare at best. I'd try to get higher marks if I were you, and with a decently-written supplemental you can definitely get in. Recall that how you write it can make a huge difference, so make sure you sell yourself well. Look throughout this thread to find the guide to writing the PSE - I've posted it multiple times.
EzZer
#35 Posted : Monday, January 02, 2012 12:37:16 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/2/2012
Posts: 1
Hi, I'm applying for Con.Ed. at Queen's and Trent-Queen's. I have a question about the Supplemental Essay - for Trent, is there a word limit? The information I read on their website said that you just need to limit it to one page. Is this true? Or do they have a word-limit like the Queen's Essay? Do they have a specific type font, font size and/or margin size for this? Also, for Trent, are we supposed to mail it to them? There's no place to submit it online...
Thanks!
Ba Ba Blue
#36 Posted : Monday, January 02, 2012 9:34:08 AM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
There is no word limit for the Trent one. It's just the page limit. There is no set style, but using standard style (1 inch margins, size 12 Times New Roman or size 10 Arial) would be advised. If you try to squish things in with a smaller font, some people might question your ability to write clear and concise. Also, yes you do send it in via the physical mail. The address to send it to is included on the cover page of your PSE (found at http://www.trentu.ca/edu...rrent/pdfs/psecover.pdf).
lyndsayb
#37 Posted : Thursday, January 05, 2012 1:35:58 PM
Rank: Frosh




Joined: 12/31/2011
Posts: 2
I was wondering when you send in your PSE for Trent. Do you get an email explaining how to send it in, or do you just use the information on the website?
Programs Applied 2012:

Carleton- Psychology (Accepted)
Ba Ba Blue
#38 Posted : Thursday, January 05, 2012 7:28:57 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
All the information you should need is available online. Just use that.
rtremb
#39 Posted : Saturday, January 07, 2012 6:03:09 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/15/2011
Posts: 24
Ba Ba Blue:
On the Trent University website it says that students with the high entrance marks get free tuition (very nice) and that this is based on GPA. Do you know how they calculate the GPA? Is it based on the average of all Grade 9-12 marks or do they just look at Grade 12 or just Grade 11 and 12?
Ba Ba Blue
#40 Posted : Saturday, January 07, 2012 6:50:52 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 478
That was one of the biggest reasons for choosing Trent (and it's surprisingly not too difficult to maintain if you stay on top of your work). They calculate it based on your entry average (so top 6 4U or 4M courses, including English).
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