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ptavasso
#1 Posted : Sunday, January 15, 2012 12:43:13 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/5/2012
Posts: 9
I will be switching from UOG to UOT next year (2012-2013) and it will be my second year. I am in molecular biology and genetics and intend to switch to biological physics/ molecular and cell biology/ health biology or another program of the sort.
I was wondering amongst the colleges at UOT (Trinity, Victoria, University, etc.), which is the best?
I will not be living on campus so the residences, buildings, location doesn't matter.

1) What are the colleges known for (science, art, humanities, etc)?
2) In terms of reputation (academic prestige, I suppose), which is the best (I've heard Trinity)?
3) Which one takes care of its students the best (best support, help, care, sense of belonging, etc)?

Extra question: If I'm in a science program, will all of my classes be in close proximity with one another? UOT is a HUGE campus and I don't want to be walking 20 minutes to each class.
UniKid
#2 Posted : Sunday, January 15, 2012 1:29:51 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 6/28/2011
Posts: 3
ptavasso wrote:
I will be switching from UOG to UOT next year (2012-2013) and it will be my second year. I am in molecular biology and genetics and intend to switch to biological physics/ molecular and cell biology/ health biology or another program of the sort.
I was wondering amongst the colleges at UOT (Trinity, Victoria, University, etc.), which is the best?
I will not be living on campus so the residences, buildings, location doesn't matter.

1) What are the colleges known for (science, art, humanities, etc)?
2) In terms of reputation (academic prestige, I suppose), which is the best (I've heard Trinity)?
3) Which one takes care of its students the best (best support, help, care, sense of belonging, etc)?

Extra question: If I'm in a science program, will all of my classes be in close proximity with one another? UOT is a HUGE campus and I don't want to be walking 20 minutes to each class.


1) Every college has students from every faculty - Humanities, Social Sciences, Science and Commerce, so does not really matter.

2) All I know about Trinity is that it costs more than the other colleges. Really what college you are in won't affect you in the future, your marks and ECs will.

3) From my experience, St. Mikes is the most social and most fun. Of course, I may be biased being a member of SMC, but I love it.

I would assume your courses would be fairly close to each other if you're in science. My friend is in a Physics&Chem program, and 4 of his courses are in the same exact room and his fifth class in in the building beside it. The way UofT course locations typically are spread is:

SW - Arcitecture/ Anthro
South Centre - Engineering
CentreWest - Sciences/Math
NW - Commerce, Film, IR
North Centre - Not Sure
Middle (Con Hall) - Huge Lectures typically first year courses - PolySci100,Sociology100, Anthropology100, Psych 100, etc
NE/Centre-East- Humanities,Social Sciences


Of course, there are random times when a class will not be in its usual area. But for the most part you will stay on the South/Centre West side of campus if you are in science. (Your electives, if any will not)
ptavasso
#3 Posted : Sunday, January 15, 2012 1:36:14 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/5/2012
Posts: 9
How much more expensive is Trinity? Is there a reason why it's more expensive?
Through your experience at St. Michael's, is their support and care for their students good?
At UOG, the care and support they provide students and the resources available are great. I heard that at UOT you feel like a number in a vast pool of people. I don't want that so I want to make sure my college cares about its students (like UOG).
I'm not sure if you're in science or not, but is your overall experience at UOT good so far?
iliketurtles
#4 Posted : Sunday, January 15, 2012 8:44:18 PM
Rank: Student Body Vice-President


Joined: 1/4/2011
Posts: 782
Trinity is barely more expensive, maybe around $1,000. We're talking $10,000/year vs $11,000/year. Don't get me wrong, $1000 is a lot of money, but it shouldn't be a make-or-break factor imo. It's probably SLIGHTLY (barely) more expensive because it has less students. That's my best guess.
Have you decided if you want to live in suite/dorm style yet?
Waterloo Mechanical Engineering '17
Applied:
McGill :) :( :( :(
Western :)
Ivey :(
U of T :) :)
Waterloo :) :) :)
ptavasso
#5 Posted : Sunday, January 15, 2012 8:52:58 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/5/2012
Posts: 9
I won't be living on campus (most likely) but if I do I prefer suite style since that's what I'm in at UOG.
Why would Trinity be more expensive though? Is it better in any way?
iliketurtles
#6 Posted : Sunday, January 15, 2012 9:20:37 PM
Rank: Student Body Vice-President


Joined: 1/4/2011
Posts: 782
I'm pretty sure what college you're in doesn't even matter if you'er not living on campus? The only thing that differs is scholarship money, which is harder to get at Trinity than anywhere else, simply because there are higher-achieving students.
Also I have no idea what the college fees are (if there are even any) if you don't live in res. It's probably pretty negligible compared to the rest of your expenses I would think?
Waterloo Mechanical Engineering '17
Applied:
McGill :) :( :( :(
Western :)
Ivey :(
U of T :) :)
Waterloo :) :) :)
trappjef
#7 Posted : Tuesday, January 17, 2012 9:50:06 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/12/2012
Posts: 38
There are lots of resources available to help students at UofT but you have to ask for them if you need them. You're not in high school anymore.
SRafiq
#8 Posted : Wednesday, January 18, 2012 11:34:36 AM
Rank: Grand Poobah


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 21,551
Without a doubt I can say that any college you pick will be a good choice as long as you're willing to make the effort to make friends. Coming in during second year and being a commuter will make it a little harder than staying on residence in first year but I'm sure you'll be able to find a group that you connect with if you engage with the different opportunities on campus. With that said, I'd probably recommend certain colleges over others because of the students they pull in. All the colleges have access to the same programs but a few programs have a history of being affiliated with certain colleges and, as a result, they pull in different kinds of students. A lot of english students try to get into Vic because it has a long history of being affiliated with the english program. Students who want to focus on the african studies program often try to get into New College because that program has been affiliated with that college. Again, you don't need to be in a certain college to enrol in a certain program but if you pick a college that is more geared to life sciences you'll meet a lot more life sciences students through events. For your purposes, I'd probably recommend a college like Trinity because there are a lot of life sci students enrolled or possibly Innis - that's where i've met most of my closest life sciences friends. When it comes to prestige, I think Trinity, Victoria, St. Mikes and UC are all tied and if you pick either of the four, you'll be very happy with the community you find if you're not really focused on finding the largest life science student population. On the sense of belonging, I'd probably put Trinity and St. Mikes ahead of the other two but again, you'll get a different response from students in different years To be really honest, I suggest coming down and talking a walk through the campus and looking at the various colleges and seeing what works best for you. Each has a lot to offer and its hard to really pin down what might be a make or break deal for you during the next three years. Also, for most of your classes, you'll inevitably get stuck traveling 20 minutes because of class sizes, room availability etc but i'd bet that living west of campus will put you closer to most of your classes than living north or east.
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
donaldbelfon
#9 Posted : Wednesday, January 18, 2012 2:18:17 PM
Rank: Frosh




Joined: 1/18/2012
Posts: 14

First off, I’ll just state that I am a Trinity College student, so of course anything I say will be a little biased, but I’ll try to be as neutral as possible.

Firstly, every college at UofT has a sort of association with a Subject PoST or department that they all specialize in, although you can access all programs from each arts and science college.. A huge amount of Trinity students for example are enrolled in International Relations, and Ethics Society and Law. Of course lots of students here are in humanities, me included we do have a good group of sciences students as well.
Secondly, Trinity College does enforce an entrance requirement, which of course makes it a little tougher to get into then the other colleges, but does add to, like you said, the prestige of Trinity College. Trin is a very old well-established college, with roots stemming from Oxford University, and traditions like the wearing of gowns to high-table dinners are why it has this notoriety of being such a prestigious location.
Finally, my favorite part of Trinity College has always been the intimacy that attending such a small college provides to its students. Trin is the smallest college at UofT accepting around 400 first year students every year. Because of this, we often get to become very well acquainted with our administrative team and they often know us on a first name basis. I’ve never had a single hesitation in contacting anyone in the; registrars, deans, or provosts office when need be. Further more, I’ve noticed through experiences with my friends at other colleges that Trin’s student population is one of the most tight-nit communities on the campus. Because we are so small, everyone invariably gets to know one another, and there is this huge sense of camaraderie that permeates all over the college.
I love Trin, and everything about it, and wholly recommend it!

To answer your “extra” question, from what I’ve experienced, all the lab buildings at UofT are all relatively close to one another, organized around the center of the campus encircling Kings College Circle, which is just a short walk from all the closest streetcar, bus, and subway stops. You’ll be fine!



University of Toronto - Trinity College
2nd Year Student
Double Major: Diaspora and Transnational Studies; Canadian Studies
Double Minor: English; Spanish
MattUK
#10 Posted : Saturday, January 21, 2012 2:34:36 AM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/30/2011
Posts: 170
donaldbelfon wrote:

First off, I’ll just state that I am a Trinity College student, so of course anything I say will be a little biased, but I’ll try to be as neutral as possible.

Firstly, every college at UofT has a sort of association with a Subject PoST or department that they all specialize in, although you can access all programs from each arts and science college.. A huge amount of Trinity students for example are enrolled in International Relations, and Ethics Society and Law. Of course lots of students here are in humanities, me included we do have a good group of sciences students as well.
Secondly, Trinity College does enforce an entrance requirement, which of course makes it a little tougher to get into then the other colleges, but does add to, like you said, the prestige of Trinity College. Trin is a very old well-established college, with roots stemming from Oxford University, and traditions like the wearing of gowns to high-table dinners are why it has this notoriety of being such a prestigious location.
Finally, my favorite part of Trinity College has always been the intimacy that attending such a small college provides to its students. Trin is the smallest college at UofT accepting around 400 first year students every year. Because of this, we often get to become very well acquainted with our administrative team and they often know us on a first name basis. I’ve never had a single hesitation in contacting anyone in the; registrars, deans, or provosts office when need be. Further more, I’ve noticed through experiences with my friends at other colleges that Trin’s student population is one of the most tight-nit communities on the campus. Because we are so small, everyone invariably gets to know one another, and there is this huge sense of camaraderie that permeates all over the college.
I love Trin, and everything about it, and wholly recommend it!

To answer your “extra” question, from what I’ve experienced, all the lab buildings at UofT are all relatively close to one another, organized around the center of the campus encircling Kings College Circle, which is just a short walk from all the closest streetcar, bus, and subway stops. You’ll be fine!




TRIN, TRIN, YOUR PARENTS GOT YOU IN.

Ah, frosh week.
University of Toronto
Mathematics and Economics Specialist (BSc.)
2015
OscarUK
#11 Posted : Saturday, January 21, 2012 4:55:09 AM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 4/16/2011
Posts: 240
donaldbelfon wrote:

Trin is a very old well-established college, with roots stemming from Oxford University, and traditions like the wearing of gowns to high-table dinners are why it has this notoriety of being such a prestigious location.



Makes me laugh every time I hear someone say this. The very definition of living off a past glory. It is said that Genghis Khan has around 16 million descendants, do they walk around with a badge or write this on their CV? No. Because it has about as much relevance as having "roots stemming from Oxford".
McGill - Arts

Xiaohaha
#12 Posted : Saturday, January 21, 2012 8:37:58 PM
Rank: Grand Poobah


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 21,551
Sample bias?
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
UofTStudent
#13 Posted : Wednesday, January 25, 2012 5:33:12 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/25/2012
Posts: 6
Everyone has a unique opinion on which college is best, because they are all very different. All of the colleges have students from various programs ranging from Life Sciences to Commerce to Humanities to Engineering to Music to Social Sciences. Each college sponsors certain programs (e.g. Trinity – Immunology, New – Human Biology, etc.), and so some students choose their college based on their program of choice. But everyone’s reasons and criteria are different; some examples are academic support, financial aid, college life, location, and size. Personally, I chose Trinity after visiting a number of the colleges because I liked the feel of it—it is very small, with only about 1800 students in total, is centrally located on campus, and has one of the highest admission average cut-offs among the colleges. Furthermore, I liked that Trinity has great camaraderie between the four separate undergraduate classes during any given year and between current students and alumni, and also has a number of unique traditions that have been passed down from year to year (e.g. formal gatherings such as Saints Ball and Conversat).

As a result of its high entrance average, Trinity does have a very good reputation for academics, but all of the colleges have this reputation, as all U of T students are required to have very good academic standing in order to get into the university. In terms of student care, all of the colleges have the same student services; though I must say that I am biased because I attend Trinity, I would say that it is one of the best colleges for supporting its students. Because it is small, it is very easy to access the services available, whether it is the Registrar, Dean of Students or Bursar’s Office. Furthermore, we have Academic Dons, who specialize in a number of different subject areas and are easily available for consultation on academic work at any stage of completion from brainstorming to revision of a completed draft. If you are living off-campus, you will find that all of the colleges have lounges and services dedicated to commuter students.

In response to your last question: your classes as a science student should be in relatively close proximity to one another, though electives may involve a longer walk. Class locations are usually grouped by subject area, but there may be the occasional one that does not follow this pattern. Regardless of how far your classes are from one another, lectures and tutorials begin at 10 minutes past the hour, so there is enough time to travel (even in the winter). Also, when you’re picking your courses, you can usually pick according to class locations given in the registration handbook and timetable.
SKHL
#14 Posted : Thursday, January 26, 2012 3:01:12 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/18/2012
Posts: 29
Every college will have its mix of students studying all sorts of subjects, I wouldn't say in particular there is a political science college or a life sciences college. So you won't have to worry about that!

There are a lot of resources and support that you will be able to find from both your college and from the greater U of T body, whether you need support on academic, personal, family or other concerns. Speaking from experience at Trinity College, our Student Heads of College and dons have been trained to provide support, whatever may be needed, and our Dean of Students has always been welcoming and available to talk to about any issues. There are writing centres to help with essay writing, and no matter what subject you are majoring in you will have a student association which provides academic support and networking events to make your university experience more interesting. You will find this to be the case no matter what college you belong to at U of T.

If you are a commuter student, speaking again from what I see at Trinity, the Non-Resident Affairs Committee (NRAC) is very active around the college. They have a very friendly common room at Trinity, organize all sorts of events (and not just for commuter students - so its not like you will only meet other commuter students) and always make sure commuter students feel just as involved and a part of the college as anyone else.

The U of T St. George campus is large, but walking isn't actually too bad! I would say the farthest walk I have to make (and that's from Trinity College, Hoskin Avenue) is to the Pharmacy Building at College and University Avenue, and I always get there in ten minutes.
University of Toronto (Trinity College) | Loran
ptavasso
#15 Posted : Friday, January 27, 2012 12:16:59 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/5/2012
Posts: 9
Thank you everyone! Your responses are much appreciated and they helped me out a lot.
icey
#16 Posted : Friday, January 27, 2012 6:10:34 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/22/2012
Posts: 21
1) As people on this thread have already said, there are students studying every sort of program in every college, so you can study everything in Arts and Science, regardless of college. That said, each college does offer certain special programs. For instance, Innis College offers the much-loved Cinema Studies program, as well as the Writing and Rhetoric and Urban Studies programs. I know UC offers the Sexual Diversity Studies program, Drama, and Canadian Studies. Woodsworth offers Criminology. New College offers Equity Studies. And so on so forth. (I worked for one of the UofT registrars in second year, that’s how I know all this lol) If you’re interested in one of these programs, you COULD apply for the corresponding college; some people like it that their college offers the program they’re enrolled in. At the same time, you don’t have to choose the college that offers your program, and traditional programs like English or Chemistry don’t have a college associated with them anyway.

2) This isn’t something that’s mattered very much, from personal experience. I’m in Innis College and people here seem pretty bright, though most of the time I talk to people in my program who aren’t always from Innis College. I don’t really think about how academically prestigious my college is or isn’t, but I feel comfortable at my college and I think that’s what matters.

3) Can’t give you an objective experience since I haven’t been at all the colleges, but I’m at Innis and the staff support is really great! I book multiple appointments with the registrar each year and they’re always happy to discuss any issues I have, whether those issues are financial or academic or just stupid questions. The small size of Innis College probably helps with that. That said, I do wish there were more clubs and stuff at Innis so that I’d be able to get more involved in my college (that said, I've joined clubs at other colleges like UC Waterdragons). I always find myself at Innis library so I guess I’ve pretty much settled in my college :P

My friend (who wrote for one of U of T’s blogs for a time) wrote a really awesome blog series in which she reviewed each of U of T’s colleges and interviewed one of the staff members of each of the colleges. She also explains what each college is known for, and she’s taken pictures of the insides and outsides of all the colleges. I know many people who have found it helpful and that’s why I’m recommending it to you now. It’s here: http://blogs.studentlife...aT/2009/10/27/colleges/
It's a year old, though, so visiting the campus may be the best option. I took a tour of the place before I came to UofT and they took me through every college. It was awesome. :D

Oh, and answer to your extra question... it depends. I’m a physics student and most of my classes have been in the physics building, though. Science courses, I think, are MOSTLY located in the mid-southern part of campus though of course there will be some exceptions cheers
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