Browse Our Top Categories

3 Pages 123>
First year NURSING @ Ryerson: Ask me! Options ▼
bludori
#1 Posted : Friday, July 15, 2011 2:19:35 PM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
Hi guys, I just finished my first year in Ryerson's nursing program and would like to share with you my experiences whether it be related to the courseload/clinicals/school life etc...

So ask away and I'll do my best to answer your questions!

Cheers!! albino
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
Paperwings
#2 Posted : Sunday, July 17, 2011 12:52:41 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 2/14/2011
Posts: 6
Hello!

Are you in the four year Ryerson program or collab.? Congrats to completing your first year. cheers

What advice would you offer to someone going into their first year in September? And how's the course work load?

I just graduated from high school with intentions of going to the Ryerson Nursing Program (George Brown collab.). However, my chem mark was lower than the admission requirement, and so my offer was revoked. But today I received a letter in my Choose>Ryerson inbox clearing my Offer of Admission. I'm assuming this means I'm officially in... ? I'm a little confused. Can you explain to me what possibly happened?

The letter says: "Please note: Students who were also given probationary admission (as stated on their Offer of Admission) must still follow their probationary admission/condition." What is a probationary condition admission? I don't think this applies to me.


Headache
#3 Posted : Sunday, July 17, 2011 6:56:44 PM
Rank: Senior Student


Joined: 4/16/2011
Posts: 83
Paperwings wrote:
Hello!

Are you in the four year Ryerson program or collab.? Congrats to completing your first year. cheers

What advice would you offer to someone going into their first year in september? And how's the course work load?

I just graduated from high school with intentions of going to the Ryerson Nursing Program (George Brown collab.). However, my chem mark was lower than the admission requirement, and so my offer was declined. But today I received a letter in my Choose>Ryerson inbox clearing my Offer of Admission. I'm assuming this means I'm officially in... ? I'm a little confused. Can you explain to me what possibly happened?

The letter says: "Please note: Students who were also given probationary admission (as stated on their Offer of Admission) must still follow their probationary admission/condition." What is a probationary condition admission? I don't think this applies to me.



if ryerson says ur clear that means u are offcially in the program, i actually
was confused with their clear document until i realized
that they said "we are pleased" meaning its
good news and u weren't confirmed for the
program they wouldnt say they are pleased, they'll probably
start with "sorry"
happygleek
#4 Posted : Sunday, July 17, 2011 8:38:10 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 3/6/2011
Posts: 49
Paperwings wrote:
Hello!

Are you in the four year Ryerson program or collab.? Congrats to completing your first year. cheers

What advice would you offer to someone going into their first year in september? And how's the course work load?

I just graduated from high school with intentions of going to the Ryerson Nursing Program (George Brown collab.). However, my chem mark was lower than the admission requirement, and so my offer was declined. But today I received a letter in my Choose>Ryerson inbox clearing my Offer of Admission. I'm assuming this means I'm officially in... ? I'm a little confused. Can you explain to me what possibly happened?

The letter says: "Please note: Students who were also given probationary admission (as stated on their Offer of Admission) must still follow their probationary admission/condition." What is a probationary condition admission? I don't think this applies to me.




Hey, don't take my word for it, but I think that in the offer of admission they said that if one of your marks is lower than the requirement that they MIGHT revoke the offer, so they don't necessarily have to. I got the same letter as you, and at first was pretty confused by the probationary thing too, but if it's the first time you're seeing something like that I don't think it applies to you.

So I guess I'll be seeing you in September!! :)

@Headache, are you going to GB too?
Headache
#5 Posted : Sunday, July 17, 2011 9:33:56 PM
Rank: Senior Student


Joined: 4/16/2011
Posts: 83
happygleek wrote:
Paperwings wrote:
Hello!

Are you in the four year Ryerson program or collab.? Congrats to completing your first year. cheers

What advice would you offer to someone going into their first year in september? And how's the course work load?

I just graduated from high school with intentions of going to the Ryerson Nursing Program (George Brown collab.). However, my chem mark was lower than the admission requirement, and so my offer was declined. But today I received a letter in my Choose>Ryerson inbox clearing my Offer of Admission. I'm assuming this means I'm officially in... ? I'm a little confused. Can you explain to me what possibly happened?

The letter says: "Please note: Students who were also given probationary admission (as stated on their Offer of Admission) must still follow their probationary admission/condition." What is a probationary condition admission? I don't think this applies to me.




Hey, don't take my word for it, but I think that in the offer of admission they said that if one of your marks is lower than the requirement that they MIGHT revoke the offer, so they don't necessarily have to. I got the same letter as you, and at first was pretty confused by the probationary thing too, but if it's the first time you're seeing something like that I don't think it applies to you.

So I guess I'll be seeing you in September!! :)

@Headache, are you going to GB too?


yea am goin GB too as well as my 3 other friends :)

if u guys havent gone to gb to get ur BScN to get ur health forms, go get it so u don't hAve to go to orientation in august, i went to
get mine 2 weeks ago nd the lady was like its
good to do it early as possible :)
happygleek
#6 Posted : Sunday, July 17, 2011 10:15:03 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 3/6/2011
Posts: 49
Oh awesome, i guess ill be seeing you in september as well :)
And what health form? Is it the sane one you need for clinical placements? (http://www.georgebrown.ca/preplacement/documents/S118-NUR-Bachelor-of-Science-in-Nursing-first-year.pdf)??
Paperwings
#7 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 12:58:24 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 2/14/2011
Posts: 6
That's great news! Thanks a lot everyone. :D

Will definitely be visiting Ryerson sometime soon to submit those forms.
bludori
#8 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 9:02:43 AM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
Paperwings wrote:
Hello!

Are you in the four year Ryerson program or collab.? Congrats to completing your first year. cheers

What advice would you offer to someone going into their first year in September? And how's the course work load?

I just graduated from high school with intentions of going to the Ryerson Nursing Program (George Brown collab.). However, my chem mark was lower than the admission requirement, and so my offer was revoked. But today I received a letter in my Choose>Ryerson inbox clearing my Offer of Admission. I'm assuming this means I'm officially in... ? I'm a little confused. Can you explain to me what possibly happened?

The letter says: "Please note: Students who were also given probationary admission (as stated on their Offer of Admission) must still follow their probationary admission/condition." What is a probationary condition admission? I don't think this applies to me.




Hi Paperwings,

First off, congrats to you on getting into the program! If you are cleared for Admission, then you're in the program (That I am 99% positive of, but make sure to call the admissions office to confirm). All you will need to complete now are the prerequisites like obtaining your CPR-HCP certificate (you can get this done now), updating your immunizations, and getting a police check. (I would try to get the police check done by the end of august/early sept at the latest because it takes 6-8 weeks to process and these three requirements are typically due the first of November if you want to avoid the 50$ late fee). I would think that you were given admission to the program for one of the following two reasons (the second one being more likely):

1) You were able to achieve satisfactory grades for all your prerequisite courses.
2) The program gained available spaces and you were next on the waitlist of students to enter the program. For highschool students, priority is always given to those who not only have the prerequisite courses but for those who have the highest grades. And so spaces in the program decline as these admission OFFERS are given out. That isn't to say that each offer will be accepted and so for the total number of admissions that are given out, only a fraction of those offers will be accepted. And so the offers that are declined become free and students like yourself who have the courses but not the grades are the next group to be offered admission into the program.

If your letter does not specifically state that you are on probationary admission then you don't have to worry about this. As far as I know, this status is typically given to students who fail to perform at minimum academic standards such as maintaining their GPA at the level their program requires (for nursing you'll need to get about a 65% in each course to pass I believe), for those who haven't met all their prerequisite courses/requirements, or if you fail to take a sufficient number of courses during the year (you're below a specific course load). This can result in restrictions on your course selection, suspension, being kicked out of your program, etc..


And now moving on....

Yes, Im in the four year collab program at the Ryerson campus :)

lol, there's a lot of advice I can give. And just by glancing below you can clearly see I've been restraining myself...Which I have. But the first piece of advice and the most imporatant one that I would give to any first year or to any university/college student for that matter would be this, "TIME MANAGEMENT!!" That means to come to class prepared by reading lecture notes/textbook beforehand (or at least having a vague idea of what will be discussed) and studying ahead of time (it's never too early to prepare for midterms/exams). I cannot stress this enough and your profs will also be pounding this into your head. Even though I say this, I'm a bit guilty myself for slacking off. But trust me, the sooner you start, the less stress you will face when midterms/exams begin because your schedule will be flooded and the workload will only continue to accumulate. Did I mention that many of your final exams in April are cumulative? :)

With that said, the courseload is actually quite reasonable in my opinion (coming from another university program). The main difference between highschool and university is that you are faced with greater responsibility of keeping track of what you learn and secondly, that the workload is much much heavier. Some courses will feel like a joke to you and you will question whether it is worth your time/effort to study something that seems so straightforward, but do it anyways (if you want that A+). If it's easy material to learn, then it will be easy to study for. Easy marks.

Another thing i would recommend you doing is to try to take notes while you study. I know many people who feel that highlighting their textbook and just reading is sufficient, which it may very well be the case during that semester, but in nursing, everything you learn is cumulative from Sept to Apr and throughout the remaining years at Ryerson and your entire life. Having those notes will be a lifesaver so that you can refer back to concepts/theory/techniques and keep track of what you are expected to know (those cumulative exams will be a no-brainer). When the final exam comes around, your notes will save you a decent amount of time and you won't be like the others who are flipping back and forth among their textbooks/lecture notes to study! If that's not enough of an incentive, also remember that the CNRE you take after you've completed the program (Canadian Registered Nurse Exam) will be testing you on everything you've learned since year 1. Try figuring out what you've learned from grade 9 if you never made notes or kept track of what was taught, not an easy task right? However, it can be overwhelming and daunting to make notes by yourself, so form study groups and share information. Many hands make light work. Again, it's all about time management and efficiency.

But needless to say, try to make time for yourself as well (which you will have because first year schedules for nursing students are incredibly compact...you usually get the entire afternoon off because most of your classes are from 8-noon. But no worries, you'll get use to it). Another nice thing about Ryerson's nursing program compared to other university programs is the sense of cohesiveness you achieve with your other nursing peers and even your profs by the end of the year. The class sizes are small...and i mean SMALL (25-30 students in your core nursing classes; anatomy/physiology will be your largest class with about 200 students; and once you start going to clinicals in your second semester around march-april, it'll be about 7 students). This means the student to professor ratio is awesomeeee!! :) You will be able to make friends more easily, form study groups, and your profs will learn your name! It'll feel like you're in highschool all over again! Overall, your social experience will be worthwhile and I guarantee you will enjoy your undergrad career immensely!

In any case, feel free to ask more questions if you have any and I'll be glad to help! albino


**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
Oxidize
#9 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 9:59:11 AM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
Are you in George brown/Cent. collab nursing or the main site (4 years). If you don't mind, would you share your mark with us? I heard that students need to maintain atleast 63% to enter second year, is that true? cheers

Thanks!
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
bludori
#10 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 11:24:03 AM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
Oxidize wrote:
Are you in George brown/Cent. collab nursing or the main site (4 years). If you don't mind, would you share your mark with us? I heard that students need to maintain atleast 63% to enter second year, is that true? cheers

Thanks!


I'm at the Ryerson campus (main site?) but all three campuses learn exactly the same material, right down to the lecture notes. The only difference is the teaching methods the prof uses and campus life. And yes, 63% would be considered the passing grade you need to achieve in order to pass the year/each semester for every course except for anatomy/physiology, which is a 50% for each midterm/exam.

My GPA was a 4.0/4.3
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
Paperwings
#11 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 1:58:53 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 2/14/2011
Posts: 6
Oh wow. Very informative and thorough! All my questions were answered... plus some more! Thank you so much! Your response helped a lot. I'm really excited for school now.

I will try to follow your advice as best as I can. =D You must be a genius considering your admission into the four year nursing program.
morraa2
#12 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 4:34:48 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/19/2011
Posts: 46
Thanks so much for offering your advice! I have a few questions myself :)
1) With respect to textbook readings, though I realize how important it is to read before class (I should be in my 4th year now..starting over haha :(), which courses actually test material from the textbook?
2) Is anatomy/physiology cumulative? ...i REALLY hope not D: lol
3) Best study spots on campus?
bludori
#13 Posted : Monday, July 18, 2011 11:56:59 PM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
morraa2 wrote:
Thanks so much for offering your advice! I have a few questions myself :)
1) With respect to textbook readings, though I realize how important it is to read before class (I should be in my 4th year now..starting over haha :(), which courses actually test material from the textbook?
2) Is anatomy/physiology cumulative? ...i REALLY hope not D: lol
3) Best study spots on campus?


1) I know exactly how you feel in terms of starting over, I was in your shoes a year ago as well :) If you really must know, you can get a passing grade with each course just by attending lectures/participating in discussion and practice labs. I don't think any course specifically follows the textbook. Most of the time, the lectures are created with the intention of textbooks acting as supplementary material. The only course I would say that you probably wouldn't need to attend would be anatomy/physiology, you can get an A+ if you memorize the textbook. But it would be a good idea to go because although the lecture notes for this course follows the textbook's outline, not every detail in the textbook is necessarily covered in lecture and therefore not considered mandatory knowledge for any tests/assignments. Needless to say, don't cut corners by skipping class, remember that in the end you are paying tuition so make the most out of it.

2) I'm afraid it is cumulative for each semester, with greater emphasis on material that hasn't been tested yet. But don't worry, many of your courses will overlap with each other and you will be exposed to the same information countless times. For example, anatomy greatly overlaps with your assessment class (probably the best class of first year nursing!) Also remember that you are going to become a NURSE! Anatomy and physiology is something you'll need to understand inside and out when you start working in clinicals in order to care for your patients/clients.

3) Study locations can be found in every available space on the Ryerson campus. You'll even find random tables set up in the hallways. I don't know what best would imply but if you like to study in groups then perhaps the cafeteria in the POD building? The library has individual tables on the upper floors but I find it too quiet and stuffy. I also like studying in the TED business building next to the Eaton centre because the space is more open and it looks nicer :) But oftentimes I'm not too picky and end just end up studying where ever space is available at the moment.
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
gowseca
#14 Posted : Tuesday, July 19, 2011 1:57:33 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 7/19/2011
Posts: 10
Hi

I was wondering when and where you can get Nursing Books for cheap prices?
Also, can you tell us some study tips?
bludori
#15 Posted : Tuesday, July 19, 2011 11:00:10 AM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
gowseca wrote:
Hi

I was wondering when and where you can get Nursing Books for cheap prices?
Also, can you tell us some study tips?


I would recommend getting textbooks after attending the first class. I know there are those who want to buy them earlier so that they can start reading ahead but the course syllabus/outline detailing what will be covered is typically handed out during the first week of class so even if you buy the books ahead of time you won't know what to read (and also because some courses like NSE12 don't follow the textbook chapter by chapter, instead you're flipping from one to the other, and there may also be supplementary material outside textbooks). You can get get cheaper textbooks at the used book store on victoria street (in front of the cp24 building) or the used book room in the student centre. In any case, have patience and wait :) You won't fall behind because not much is covered during the first week of class!

You'll also be given a weekly topic outline which is a week to week breakdown of the topics to be covered and also course objectives that state what you should know for lectures and for your labs; assignments and supplementary information is also provided on this outline. Ryerson's nursing program actually makes an impressive effort to create a super detailed syllabus so that you can stay on track and know what material you are responsible for. Keep these outlines on hand as they will help you study for your tests and for the future CNRA exam. Here's an example of the weekly topic outline for health assessment (NSE13):



And as for study tips? I would recommend reading/skimming over the lecture slides and textbook materials first and then go through it in detail to answer the class/lab objectives (see above). There is often more material in the required readings that are not covered in the objectives but that does not mean it's not testable material. Everything mentioned in lecture and listed in the outlines is fair game. And of course, try to do all these each week instead of letting it accumulate.

**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
morraa2
#16 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 10:50:25 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 1/19/2011
Posts: 46
@bludori - so thorough thanks so much!! :) What program / school were you in before? And you get a weekly outline?! That's..well that's awesome lol. I have another question regarding essays/papers you wrote this year if that's okay.. I'm coming from a science background so I haven't really written an actual essay in a LONG time..just scientific papers / critiques. I know that there are writing workshops etc. but do you have any other tips for essay success?
ttaarraa
#17 Posted : Thursday, July 21, 2011 10:29:38 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/28/2010
Posts: 16
Hi! Thanks for answering all our questions :)

1. I'm very sure I want to be a nurse. The only thing I'm worried about is the, for lack of better word, gross stuff (ie. blood and injections,etc). How much of this did you deal with in 1st year? I get kind of queasy easily, but I am very willing to work on it!
2. Where did you have your clinical placement?
3. What was your schedule like? I'm commuting so I really don't want early morning classes :( Did you get to choose your class times? Or was your schedule made for you?
4. What elective did you take? Any you recommend?

Thank you so so much!
bludori
#18 Posted : Friday, July 22, 2011 1:07:41 PM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
morraa2 wrote:
@bludori - so thorough thanks so much!! :) What program / school were you in before? And you get a weekly outline?! That's..well that's awesome lol. I have another question regarding essays/papers you wrote this year if that's okay.. I'm coming from a science background so I haven't really written an actual essay in a LONG time..just scientific papers / critiques. I know that there are writing workshops etc. but do you have any other tips for essay success?


Hi morraa, I know exactly what you mean about essay writing. To suddenly change from writing about objective data to something so subjective like your feelings was a huge challenge for me because I knew what I wanted to write but the problem was how to express it. You are right, there are workshops available and you are also free to ask your professors for their opinions and collaborate with your peers, but I found it to be a trial and error experience. You're given detailed rubrics on how to go about writing the essays so as long as you follow their guidelines and answer the questions they want you to answer, you should be fine. Like I mentioned, it's all trial and error and also about discovering yourself through it whether it be your strengths/weaknesses/beliefs/values/opinions/etc... I know it sounds pretty philosophical but that is one of the major areas first nursing focuses on and you'll be expected to write these types of essays your whole undergraduate and even through your nursing career. Ultimately, how do you empathize with your patients' experiences if you don't understand your own feelings on that issue. Heck, you may not even be able to because your values may conflict with theirs. Initially I felt that these essays and discussions were meaningless and a waste of time- isn't nursing centered on promoting healing the physical self? But I was ignorant and after first year, you realize that nursing encompasses so much more. You start to understand your patients on a level beyond their physiological state because a part of the healing process also involves an emotional/mental/spiritual aspect in addition to the physical parts (holistic nursing as you'll learn it is called). But overall, don't fret too much, don't worry if you do poorly on you first few essays or have trouble writing because you WILL get a hang of it and expressing yourself on paper will be as natural as breathing by the year end :)
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
bludori
#19 Posted : Friday, July 22, 2011 1:34:15 PM
Rank: Student Body President


Joined: 3/3/2010
Posts: 15,669
ttaarraa wrote:
Hi! Thanks for answering all our questions :)

1. I'm very sure I want to be a nurse. The only thing I'm worried about is the, for lack of better word, gross stuff (ie. blood and injections,etc). How much of this did you deal with in 1st year? I get kind of queasy easily, but I am very willing to work on it!
2. Where did you have your clinical placement?
3. What was your schedule like? I'm commuting so I really don't want early morning classes :( Did you get to choose your class times? Or was your schedule made for you?
4. What elective did you take? Any you recommend?

Thank you so so much!


Np! I'm glad my answers are helping.

1. Firstly, I have to disappoint you on this as you don't even come close to handling needles in first year. Despite that, from my personal experience, I have worked with needles before although on animals (rats) but I'm quite sure that doing this on a person will be much less difficult as you don't have to worry about too much fidgeting. But good for you that you're willing to make that effort because I believe that if you have the right mindset then your chances of achieving your goal will be much more likely :) As for blood, you don't work with it per-se, but you might come across some blood during your clinicals if accidents happen to occur (which is very unlikely, but possible nonetheless). The best thing is to try to keep level headed and not panic. If it helps, try to think of blood/injections as a separate component of the person itself, much like how you would see a piece of meat being sold in a supermarket- personally I just see it as a piece of meat ready to be eaten rather than flesh that's been cut off an animal (sorry for the odd analogy but hopefully that makes sense somewhat?). And also remember to keep focused. If your task is to give an injection, then always keep that goal in mind because once your mind starts wandering, the chance of error in your technique increases. In any case, my apologies for rambling on, but by the end of year 1, the only "icky" stuff you'll most likely come into contact with are feces/urine/and possibly vomit if your patient happens to regurgitate their meal.

2. My clinical placement was at Belmont House just outside Rosedale station Ryerson students had a choice of Belmont/Kensington/or Sunnybrook Hospital and you numbered your preference of the three. They are all centered on long term care patients. Many students believed that working at Sunnybrook hospital was the best choice because, well, it's a "hospital" as opposed to the other two which are retirement homes/long term care facilities. But ultimately, you end up working with similar patients (older adults) so I would base my choice on location because you have to be on site by 7am. Besides, you'll be working in hospitals in second year so don't feel that you'll be disadvantaged. As such, choose the location closest to where you'll be living to save on time on commuting.

3. My first year schedule was all morning classes (usually at 8am-1pm with the exception of your elective/liberal and anatomy/physiology which may be scheduled later during the day).

4. Just a note of caution that when choosing your elective/liberal, be mindful of the course restrictions as certain programs prevent you from taking certain courses. For example, I recall that nursing students may not take any psychology courses as their elective. My elective was SCI182- Biology of a Living City. A very easy course if you come from a science background since the course itself is geared towards students with no knowledge in science at all. I enjoyed it because it covered topics on a very broad scale from evolution to genetics.
**Shields**
Accepted:
University of Toronto: Social Sciences + Vic One (Pearson Stream)
Carleton University: Honours Science
University of British Columbia: Arts
ttaarraa
#20 Posted : Monday, July 25, 2011 1:26:34 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/28/2010
Posts: 16
My commute will take AT LEAST an hour every day, ugh I really don't want 8am classes!
By the way, that elective does sound really interesting. Was there much reading involved?
3 Pages 123>
Conversation Jump  

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2014, Yet Another Forum.NET
Copyright © 2003-2014 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.
Copyright © 1998-2014 StudentAwards All rights reserved.