Browse Our Top Categories

HIgh School AP courses - business Options ▼
Mar
#1 Posted : Thursday, January 06, 2011 4:41:02 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 12/20/2010
Posts: 67
I know there is already one TOPIC about AP courses in Academics section but it doesn't answer my questions

How hard are AP courses compared to regular once?
I want to go in the business. Right now I am taking courses in Online School and I can take there grade 12 AP courses as well.
Can someone tell me what AP courses can benefit me in the university?
Here is the list of courses I can take:

AP Biology
AP Calculus
AP Chemistry
Ap Human Geography
AP Macroeconomics
AP Physics
AP Psychology
AP Statistics
AP US Government and Politics
Ap World History

I am thinking about taking AP Calculus, AP Macroeconomics but I also might be interested in AP Statistics, AP US Government and Politics, AP World History and AP Psychology.

Cheers, cheers

Mar!
1) UBC Commerce
CanadaBoy
#2 Posted : Thursday, January 06, 2011 5:33:12 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 12/21/2010
Posts: 76
AP Courses are a pretty good deal, as they only cost ~$100 (test + books) and allow you to get a credit for a class that costs $600-$800. This advantage is significantly negated in many Canadian schools, where limits are imposed on the number of AP credits you can redeem.

The courses are marked on a scale of 1-5, where 1 means that you are not prepared at all (you get a 1 for showing up), and 5 meaning you exceed the requirements for the credit. While they may sound easy, be aware that these scores are based on a curve, and while this means no test will ever be "easier" or "harder" year-over-year, it also means that you can never really be sure what you will get. Most universities will only allow you to claim an exemption for a course if you get a 4 or higher in a course.

As far as difficulty goes, most can be self-studied in one semester easily. However, most intensive courses such as AP Biology and AP Calculus will require much more studying than courses that are considered "easier", such as AP Human Geography (apparently a hour-long review is enough for this one).

AP Macroeconomics is one that I have taken in the past. It is doable, but studying is necessary. You don't need a textbooks for most AP courses, and a study guide is often enough. College Confidential, the American equivalent to StudentAwards, covers AP tests much more in-depth. I suggest searching for a list of recommended study guides for AP courses on there, as theirs is quite informative.

Best of luck!
Attending:
UW/WLU BCS/BBA Double Degree Co-Op (2016)
Proud recipient of the Loran Award
Mar
#3 Posted : Friday, January 07, 2011 11:52:20 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 12/20/2010
Posts: 67
CanadaBoy wrote:
AP Courses are a pretty good deal, as they only cost ~$100 (test + books) and allow you to get a credit for a class that costs $600-$800. This advantage is significantly negated in many Canadian schools, where limits are imposed on the number of AP credits you can redeem.

The courses are marked on a scale of 1-5, where 1 means that you are not prepared at all (you get a 1 for showing up), and 5 meaning you exceed the requirements for the credit. While they may sound easy, be aware that these scores are based on a curve, and while this means no test will ever be "easier" or "harder" year-over-year, it also means that you can never really be sure what you will get. Most universities will only allow you to claim an exemption for a course if you get a 4 or higher in a course.

As far as difficulty goes, most can be self-studied in one semester easily. However, most intensive courses such as AP Biology and AP Calculus will require much more studying than courses that are considered "easier", such as AP Human Geography (apparently a hour-long review is enough for this one).

AP Macroeconomics is one that I have taken in the past. It is doable, but studying is necessary. You don't need a textbooks for most AP courses, and a study guide is often enough. College Confidential, the American equivalent to StudentAwards, covers AP tests much more in-depth. I suggest searching for a list of recommended study guides for AP courses on there, as theirs is quite informative.

Best of luck!


10/10 Thank you! Very informative!

I'll try to find more info on google and college confidential. That website is just a little confusing.

Can you tell me whats the difference between Ap course and a normal one?
Currently I am taking Calculus and Economics and I just applied for AP Calulucs AB and AP Macroeconomics.

1) UBC Commerce
CanadaBoy
#4 Posted : Saturday, January 08, 2011 12:22:51 AM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 12/21/2010
Posts: 76
Mar wrote:
CanadaBoy wrote:
AP Courses are a pretty good deal, as they only cost ~$100 (test + books) and allow you to get a credit for a class that costs $600-$800. This advantage is significantly negated in many Canadian schools, where limits are imposed on the number of AP credits you can redeem.

The courses are marked on a scale of 1-5, where 1 means that you are not prepared at all (you get a 1 for showing up), and 5 meaning you exceed the requirements for the credit. While they may sound easy, be aware that these scores are based on a curve, and while this means no test will ever be "easier" or "harder" year-over-year, it also means that you can never really be sure what you will get. Most universities will only allow you to claim an exemption for a course if you get a 4 or higher in a course.

As far as difficulty goes, most can be self-studied in one semester easily. However, most intensive courses such as AP Biology and AP Calculus will require much more studying than courses that are considered "easier", such as AP Human Geography (apparently a hour-long review is enough for this one).

AP Macroeconomics is one that I have taken in the past. It is doable, but studying is necessary. You don't need a textbooks for most AP courses, and a study guide is often enough. College Confidential, the American equivalent to StudentAwards, covers AP tests much more in-depth. I suggest searching for a list of recommended study guides for AP courses on there, as theirs is quite informative.

Best of luck!


10/10 Thank you! Very informative!

I'll try to find more info on google and college confidential. That website is just a little confusing.

Can you tell me whats the difference between Ap course and a normal one?
Currently I am taking Calculus and Economics and I just applied for AP Calulucs AB and AP Macroeconomics.



Depends if you are a person who gets higher marks in class or in exams. AP grades do not take into consideration stuff such as classwork, homework, assignments, etc. and this may be positive or negative for you. If you do better in exams, AP is great for you because you only have to do 1 exam and that's it. Either way, they are generally considered harder and they are applicable towards first year credits. That is the only major difference.

Also, if you haven't finalized your decision yet, I suggest taking Calculus BC instead of AB and taking both economics courses. I haven't taken Calculus myself, but I know that you when you do the BC, you get two scores: a BC total score and an AB score. Not sure if the AB score counts for anything, but you should do some research on that. Either way, I don't think many universities accept AB as a credit for first-year calculus. As for economics, I feel that both the topics have so much of the general theory in common (marginal costs, supply and demand, game theory, etc.) that taking one without taking the other is like doing 70% of the work for 50% benefit (1 out of 2 possible credits).

Best of luck!
Attending:
UW/WLU BCS/BBA Double Degree Co-Op (2016)
Proud recipient of the Loran Award
Conversation Jump  

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2014, Yet Another Forum.NET
Copyright © 2003-2014 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.
Copyright © 1998-2014 StudentAwards All rights reserved.