Browse Our Top Categories

4 Pages <1234>
***QUEENS CON ED *** Options ▼
CrèmeGlacée
#21 Posted : Thursday, February 02, 2012 1:36:19 PM
Rank: Senior Student


Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 122
Ba Ba Blue wrote:
I'll let someone else answer the question about class size, but it's pretty typical for the size of the university.

As for party school, the answer is yes. Queen's definitely parties hard. What you can tell your mom is that there will be parties wherever you go (a university without keggers every weekend is non-existent). What you can tell her is that you have the will-power to resist the urge to attend these and will still take your studies very seriously. The fact that Queen's is known to be a party school only matters if you go to the parties and make poor decisions.

To learn more about the clubs at Queen's, go to http://myams.org/. That's the Queen's student government website. There is a tab for clubs that you can look under to see what you would be interested in.

Past 4 years indicates they want something more recent. Putting them would show that you haven't done enough recently. Instead, try highlighting more recent awards and activities. As for the volunteer vs. unpaid employment, volunteer indicates that it was a repeated commitment that they would've been sad if they didn't see you (i.e. going EVERY WEEK to a hospital to volunteer - committed long-term), whereas a "volunteer" experience could be a one-off event you helped with, or a committee that you were a part of. Really, it's all open to how you interpret your experiences.

As for the 2 tutoring jobs, I would just use 1. Queen's likes to see diversity in your experiences.


Alright, thanks for your help! I'm still confused about volunteer vs. unpaid employment though. Do you mean that unpaid employment= repeated commitment, and volunteer= one time experience... or the other way around? I was thinking that Queens would prefer long term activities to one-time experiences?

Oh and I think I'm going to have trouble choosing which clubs to join (if I get accepted into Queens!) Wow, there's so many! Out of curiosity, are there any music/piano clubs that are open for non music students?
The only thing is, I haven't really won many recent awards- so that awards section is going to be pretty empty, there's 5 spaces.

One more question (sorry I have so many)... kind of random, but one of extracurriculars is web design. I have a website about the environment/eco friendly living. Would they want me to put the URL too? I feel kind of weird about doing that, I don't know if its a good EC but I do spend a lot of time on it.

Fawlkes
#22 Posted : Friday, February 03, 2012 9:42:47 AM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/26/2011
Posts: 69
Hey, just wanted to add a bit more to the answers Babablue gave you. :)

First of all, while class sizes vary greatly (my largest has 400 students in one lecture, and my smallest, 80) one of the many great things about Queen's is that there is a lab or tutorial component to almost every single first year course, with a maximum of 25 students in it, meaning lots of contact with TAs and chances for in depth discusions in small group settings. In fact on of my tutorials has only 10 people in it. As for the profs, generally they are pretty good, but as I'm sure you've found with teachers in high school, some are fantastic, others... not so much... That's one thing that really doesn't change once you get to university.

As for Queen's being a party school, it's not nearly as severe as many media outlets (and sometimes Queen's students themselves) would have you believe. Parties happen at every university, including Queen's. But there are also many people at Queen's who choose not to party. I've never been a fan of binge drinking, and the "party culture" at Queen's has never been an issue for me. Also, Con-Ed is a really safe and friendly environment. We're more of a family than a faculty. We tend to laugh when there are big functions like a dance, because most college parties conjure images of well... dirty dancing to say the least. But at Con-Ed jams WE LINE DANCE TO ABBA. We're big on personal space, conga lines, YMCA and the backstreet boy imitations. Con-Ed is probably the most G-rated environment on campus. :)

As for awards, you could also include things for which you were selected to participate, such as representing your school at a conference, achievement levels in a sport or activity such as piano levels or earning a bronze cross in swimming, promotions you were given at work, etc.

And yes, Queen's has MANY clubs. Unfortunatly, not all of them are as active as one might hope. So sign up for whatever appeals to you and you'll soon figure out which are worth your time and effort, and will give you the most enjoyment.

As for the unpaid employment vs. volunteer thing, I got in contact with the Con-Ed office about that one, and aparently unpaid employment is when you are assigned a time and place where you must show up because you made a commitment. Volunteer work is when you are not assigned but choose to show up at a time of your own choosing, even if it is the same time every week. So teaching kids to swim from 3-5 every monday would be unpaid employment, but dropping in to your local food bank, unassigned to volunteer every week at the same time would be volunteer work. However, if you have had 5 or more paying jobs, you may list unpaid employment as volunteer work.

And finally, no, you don't need to put the URL, and it is obviously something you are passionate about and it demonstrates a diverse skill set, so I think it would be a great thing to include! And remember, you have to put an estimate of the time you spend on it, so that alone will show how much you care about it and put into it.

Best of luck!
QUEEN'S CON-ED CLASS OF 2015
CrèmeGlacée
#23 Posted : Friday, February 03, 2012 5:43:03 PM
Rank: Senior Student


Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 122
Fawlkes wrote:
Hey, just wanted to add a bit more to the answers Babablue gave you. :)

First of all, while class sizes vary greatly (my largest has 400 students in one lecture, and my smallest, 80) one of the many great things about Queen's is that there is a lab or tutorial component to almost every single first year course, with a maximum of 25 students in it, meaning lots of contact with TAs and chances for in depth discusions in small group settings. In fact on of my tutorials has only 10 people in it. As for the profs, generally they are pretty good, but as I'm sure you've found with teachers in high school, some are fantastic, others... not so much... That's one thing that really doesn't change once you get to university.

As for Queen's being a party school, it's not nearly as severe as many media outlets (and sometimes Queen's students themselves) would have you believe. Parties happen at every university, including Queen's. But there are also many people at Queen's who choose not to party. I've never been a fan of binge drinking, and the "party culture" at Queen's has never been an issue for me. Also, Con-Ed is a really safe and friendly environment. We're more of a family than a faculty. We tend to laugh when there are big functions like a dance, because most college parties conjure images of well... dirty dancing to say the least. But at Con-Ed jams WE LINE DANCE TO ABBA. We're big on personal space, conga lines, YMCA and the backstreet boy imitations. Con-Ed is probably the most G-rated environment on campus. :)

As for awards, you could also include things for which you were selected to participate, such as representing your school at a conference, achievement levels in a sport or activity such as piano levels or earning a bronze cross in swimming, promotions you were given at work, etc.

And yes, Queen's has MANY clubs. Unfortunatly, not all of them are as active as one might hope. So sign up for whatever appeals to you and you'll soon figure out which are worth your time and effort, and will give you the most enjoyment.

As for the unpaid employment vs. volunteer thing, I got in contact with the Con-Ed office about that one, and aparently unpaid employment is when you are assigned a time and place where you must show up because you made a commitment. Volunteer work is when you are not assigned but choose to show up at a time of your own choosing, even if it is the same time every week. So teaching kids to swim from 3-5 every monday would be unpaid employment, but dropping in to your local food bank, unassigned to volunteer every week at the same time would be volunteer work. However, if you have had 5 or more paying jobs, you may list unpaid employment as volunteer work.

And finally, no, you don't need to put the URL, and it is obviously something you are passionate about and it demonstrates a diverse skill set, so I think it would be a great thing to include! And remember, you have to put an estimate of the time you spend on it, so that alone will show how much you care about it and put into it.

Best of luck!


Thanks for explaining everything, your explanation about unpaid employment vs volunteering makes so much sense! And now I can fill up my awards section, =D
But I still think I might have to put something like "Honour Roll"
Would that look bad? Because I've been getting the honour roll since grade 9 but I only have space to put one of the years down.

After reading your post I'm even more excited about Queen's :) and less worried about my PSE now (and the partying).
For my ECs, would it make sense to put playing piano/piano lessons/ performing at senior homes/ duets all under one category? They're all kind of related and I'd have trouble estimating the time I spend if I write it down separately. I mean I practise for piano lessons and my performances at the same time...

And wow I just thought of another question... maybe I'm otherthinking.
But if I plan on doing an activity every week for less than I year, what do I put for # of weeks per year? Do I put 52/52 to show that I'm doing it every week, or just write down the actual number of weeks I plan to do the activity?
Fawlkes
#24 Posted : Tuesday, February 07, 2012 3:36:30 AM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/26/2011
Posts: 69
It makes perfect sense to put all those piano related things into one item.

Also, you only need to put the numer of weeks you plan to do the activity. Remember, the number of characters you can use is limited, so it is best to conserve them while you can. If you are doing it every week for a full year, just put 52. If you are doing it for the school year, put 38 or whatever it works out to. They'll pretty much figure out from that that there is an off season, but that otherwise, you do it every week.
QUEEN'S CON-ED CLASS OF 2015
CrèmeGlacée
#25 Posted : Friday, February 10, 2012 7:39:47 PM
Rank: Senior Student


Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 122
Thanks again for your help!

For the PSE, do you think having done the activity for a longer period of time would be valued over what the actual activity is?
I started a few great ECs this year/ last year, but I'm worried that it won't be valued as much because I haven't been doing it for a long time. On the other hand, I felt that the experiences were valuable and would be nice to talk about in my essays. So I'm kind of conflicted. I wish we had more than 5 spaces!

Another thing, what if I've been doing an activity for 3 years, but during the first year, I only did it once every 2 months and then started doing it every week... or something like that? I don't want to over/underestimate my hours

Also, I don't have many "official" community service hours. After I hit 40, I kind of stopped bothering with the forms... Will Queen's look at that?

And does anyone know last year's entrance average for Con Ed, both arts and science?
Fawlkes
#26 Posted : Friday, February 10, 2012 11:40:05 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/26/2011
Posts: 69
For the PSE all activities are considered equally, for the sub ap, ones that you can relate to teaching or kids are preferable. My advice is to pick the ones you are most passionate about as they will inspire the best writing.

Just try to estimate hours as closely as possible. You'll know if you are being honest with yourself.

No, Queen's won't check your official community hours. They do however call one of every 10 referees to confirm truth in the statements.

And finally, this year's entrance average for Con Ed Arts and Science combined was 93. The entrance average for the class of 2015 across all faculties was 88.
QUEEN'S CON-ED CLASS OF 2015
CrèmeGlacée
#27 Posted : Saturday, February 11, 2012 9:42:46 AM
Rank: Senior Student


Joined: 8/23/2011
Posts: 122
Fawlkes wrote:
For the PSE all activities are considered equally, for the sub ap, ones that you can relate to teaching or kids are preferable. My advice is to pick the ones you are most passionate about as they will inspire the best writing.

Just try to estimate hours as closely as possible. You'll know if you are being honest with yourself.

No, Queen's won't check your official community hours. They do however call one of every 10 referees to confirm truth in the statements.

And finally, this year's entrance average for Con Ed Arts and Science combined was 93. The entrance average for the class of 2015 across all faculties was 88.



Just to clarify, the referee doesn't need to be able to confirm all the statements right? I don't know anyone who can confirm every single one of my activities (other than my parents).

I was thinking of asking my IB coordinator, since she sees my CAS forms and will know about some (most?) of my activities. Or should I ask about someone who actually directly supervises one of the activities I wrote about??

Thanks!
kuroiimiyumi
#28 Posted : Saturday, February 25, 2012 5:31:26 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 12
Hello,
I have a few questions to ask, if that is okay (:

I applied to the Queen's Science Concurrent Education program and I was just wondering if they did acceptances before they see all your top 6 marks? I don't have a Calculus mark into OUAC yet since it will get sent in around mid to end of April.

Would I still have a chance of getting accepted in March or April if my top 5 (without Calc) has an average of 92.4%?

I've heard of people who get accepted in March, but is that only for those who won/got nominated for a major award?

Also, to those who have been in the program, what is the practical experience in school like? What do you have to do? And also, since it's from May to June, after the university school year officially ends, are there any disadvantages?

Thank you so much in advance!
ticklemuffin
#29 Posted : Saturday, February 25, 2012 6:52:37 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 2/20/2012
Posts: 18
I too want to go for Con Ed with a BA at Queen's.

Any tips on how to make myself more appealing? :)
Ba Ba Blue
#30 Posted : Saturday, February 25, 2012 10:48:59 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 466
kuroiimiyumi, I was not a major award applicant and I did not have my top 6 in yet either but I was accepted before March break. Mind you my average was slightly higher than yours (95%-ish) and I felt I had a very strong personal statement and essay. In short, you have a chance but I'm wagering that you'll be accepted in a later round based on what I've read around this forum in past years.

As for your practicum, it's great! In Queen's-Trent we do much more work associated with it than the Queen's people do (our program coordinator is big on making sure we get the most possible out of our placement), but the expectations are essentially the same. You have 10 days of "observe and assist" in first year. You are not expected to do any teaching, but some teachers have you do some anyways if they think you're ready for it. It's mainly to apply the learning you do throughout the year in a practical setting...in many ways I found PRAC to be far more useful than PROF.

As for when you do your placement, there are varied opinions on this. You're doing enough during the school year, so it's nice to be able to have more time for actual school without fitting placement in there. You'll be grateful that you can put 100% of your concentration on the placement and get the most out of it. On the other hand, in Queen's-Trent we do our placement throughout the year as we can fit it (possible since we have 2 reading weeks at Trent). We do this because our instructor likes to include peoples' experiences in placement as a part of our class discussion and reflection so that we can apply what we're learning in PROF directly to something tangible, so it really makes PROF class feel more useful. Each way has its pros and cons...but it'll be great either way!

As for ticklemuffin, I suggest you check out http://www.trentu.ca/edu...oncurrent/pdfs/pse.pdf. It's a guide published by the Queen's-Trent office, but they get a lot of the same applicants and the PSE for Trent is very similar to the things you have to write for Queen's, so it's definitely worth checking out to make yourself stand out at Queen's too. The Queen's-Trent office staff are so helpful like that :).
Queen's-Trent Concurrent Education, '14 (Trent B.Sc) and '15 (Queen's B.Ed)
skykovacs
#31 Posted : Sunday, February 26, 2012 10:13:16 AM
Rank: Frosh




Joined: 11/15/2011
Posts: 2
Hi all,

I was accepted to Queen's Con-Ed program for with a Bachelor in Hons. English and I am extremely interested in going. I'm slightly concerned, however, with the cost factor. On a personal level, do you believe the tuition and residency costs are worth it? I've also been accepted to Brock's Con-Ed, and since I live nearby, it seems to be a good choice, but Queen's has prestige and plenty more options... Any information/opinions would be greatly appreciated.
kuroiimiyumi
#32 Posted : Sunday, February 26, 2012 9:46:36 PM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 12
Ba Ba Blue, thank you so much for your answer! It really helped a lot!
I'm just really scared that my marks will drop below decent when April marks are sent in, and I won't get accepted at all! When is the round after the one before march break?
And I also have a job at the moment being a teacher's helper for kids aged 5 and 6, and also actually teaching kids aged 3 to 4 mathematics. I also have many leadership roles in clubs in school. Would this give me a good advantage in my PSE?

I've also read on the Queen's website (unless I interpreted it wrong), that I am to take 2 Education courses as well as a full course load for my Bachelor of Science. Would this give me an extremely large workload? Is it hard to deal with?

Sorry for the many questions again, and thank you very much!
Ba Ba Blue
#33 Posted : Monday, February 27, 2012 12:21:31 AM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 466
skykovacs, IMO residence and tuition at Queen's are definitely worth it, but I don't have any specific anecdotes to back that up. I'll let the Queen's Con.Ed people answer that for you.

kuroiimiyumi, if you don't get accepted in March, that means they want to wait for your next round of marks (which is most people). I suggest you try super hard so that the marks don't drop too much when April grades come out, because I have a feeling that Queen's will want to take a look.

As for your experiences, I say they're fine. When you're writing the PSE and essay, make sure you pick a variety of experiences to show how well-rounded and varied your interests are. Don't just pick the helper and preschool teacher as your experiences because they are the ones that are most relevant to teaching - pick them if they're the most meaningful for you. I should point out that your profile sounds quite similar to a lot of applicants (most people I know have done summer camp jobs and/or co-op placements in schools...what else can you talk about to set yourself apart? Consider that).

As for the extra course, it's not too bad at all. The con.ed instructors are very aware that you're on course overload to take their course and take that into account when designing it. You'll notice that the con.ed course will be more opinion and reflection based, and less based on research and things like that which take a considerable amount of time. I find the course to be a lot of busy work, but I hear at Queen's the workload is less since they have different instructors so that shouldn't be a problem for you. Regardless, you'll do very well in the course and won't have to do much work for it - DON'T WORRY. It is very easy to deal with.
Queen's-Trent Concurrent Education, '14 (Trent B.Sc) and '15 (Queen's B.Ed)
Omok
#34 Posted : Wednesday, February 29, 2012 8:41:24 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/7/2011
Posts: 74
skykovacs wrote:
Hi all,

I was accepted to Queen's Con-Ed program for with a Bachelor in Hons. English and I am extremely interested in going. I'm slightly concerned, however, with the cost factor. On a personal level, do you believe the tuition and residency costs are worth it? I've also been accepted to Brock's Con-Ed, and since I live nearby, it seems to be a good choice, but Queen's has prestige and plenty more options... Any information/opinions would be greatly appreciated.


My inner Queen's student is screaming: BROCK > QUEEN'S? NEVEAAAAAAAILHCASLHDILSA. NO! DON'T DO THAT TO YOURSELF!!!!

Proper answer:

Get OSAP.

The more money you need, the more they give/grant/loan to you.

(I'm going about answering this with the assumption that you come from a middle-class income bracket. Which the government of Canada lists as annual family income under 80 thousand. BUT, for example, if your annual income is higher than that, but your family have more financial needs, like, a lot of kids to support, OSAP will take that into account.)

For example, let's assume my family income is 70K a year. If I were to stay at home and go to University of Toronto my OSAP amount would be 7000 (or something like that).

But going to Queen's, I get 13000 instead.

Looking at it simply; it seems like, I get the worse deal by attending queen's, since it means I have to spent 12K on meal+residence and only get 5K extra in OSAP.

NOPE.

OSAP: the first 7K = loan, anything ON TOP of that, is GRANT.

what that means:

1. I get 5000 for free by going to queen's, repaying 7000
2. Since the further I am away from home, the higher my cost-estimates are, THE MORE BURSARIES I get from Queen's. (This year, I got about 4000$ in bursaries)

So my money resources this year:

Money IN:
13K OSAP
2K scholarship
4K Bursary

Money OUT:
7K tuition (con-ed more pricy)
6K residence (I live on West Campus...yay...=_=;)
3K Meal plan (West campus meal plans are optional, and it's slightly cheaper if you pick something like mine, which is annual 320.)

In the end:

If i watch my spending, I get a few thousand left over, with a 7K debt to the government (which is interest free till I graduate for six months)

Student debt is scary, and it's a lot, but, it's worth it if you get an amazing experience in a wonderful program. (right right? right!) -- and in the end, the actual costs of attending school far away from home, or near home; is very much the same. Depending on how you spent your money.
Queen's Con-current Education. =)
Omok
#35 Posted : Wednesday, February 29, 2012 9:04:05 PM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/7/2011
Posts: 74
On placements (PRAC):

I have a really endeared friend of mine in the Queen's-Trent con-ed program, and both of us recently did our placements in the past week. (Reading week).

interesting (and very amusing on my part) differences regrading our placements:
- Queen's Placement....We don't have written reports to hand in.
- Trent placement.... :) they're stuck with some kind of paper to hand in
- Conclusion: queen's placement = more fun because we have less work! (for now at least)

It was fun, the placement, it's still fresh on my mind. And it's very different from what I expected and imagined. (And man, it felt empowering when I was permitted to teach one lesson and all the kids focused on me completely...felt like a teacher.)

Of course, since I had my PRAC during reading week, I didn't touch any of my school work at all (But the question is instead: Would I have touched anything even IF my PRAC wasn't in reading week?) -- that's the down side.

Upside: In feb, the kids are still warming up their seats and they're still able to be influenced/changed by your presence in the classroom, whereas (I've been told by an upper year) later on in May, not so much. They're just waiting for summer then, and dreads every minute of school.

So: Try setting up your PRAC during reading week at least in your first year, not like you'll do any school work anyways. (HAHA, assumptions, i'm kidding, maybe you will?)

On PROF class:

Honestly: some people take notes, some people don't. (guess which I am? I'm the majority group.) -- the slides and stuff, are all posted online. So if you need it, when you do, and you do once every term, you can easily find them.
- Our prof sings in class. he came to class in a costume once.
- we have pretty cool discussions in class (And no bring-home work/readings. EVER. :D)

Answer:

For first year con-ed students, the extra PROF/PRAC classes aren't a lot of workload on top of your normal stream. (Of course, if you procrastinate, you'll be screwed too. Since the essays/assignments for PROF, two of them each term, is due in the typical week where EVERYTHING IS DUE.)

batman plan/spent your time wisely and PROF/PRAC is nothing. cheers (Of course, most people are unwise in this aspect...ha-ha...but we all get A anyways!)
Queen's Con-current Education. =)
Ba Ba Blue
#36 Posted : Wednesday, February 29, 2012 11:51:11 PM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 466
Omok, the materials we submit for our placement are really only marked for completion (quality is irrelevant). It isn't that bad! You make it sound like we're slaving away while you basque in the sun... OK maybe it's like that a bit :P. You lucky Queen's people not having to do anything on placement!
Queen's-Trent Concurrent Education, '14 (Trent B.Sc) and '15 (Queen's B.Ed)
jennyt
#37 Posted : Friday, March 09, 2012 12:14:00 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/1/2011
Posts: 5
Hi, I just had some question about teaching placements.

1. How are teaching placements assigned? Am I responsible for searching for them independently? Or am I provided with options of schools to choose from?
2. Geographically, how restricted am I with placements? For example, would I be able to go as far as the Hamilton area? Or am I restricted to certain school boards?

Thank you very much in advance if anyone can answer these questions for me! I appreciate it. :)
Ba Ba Blue
#38 Posted : Friday, March 09, 2012 8:46:16 AM
Rank: Student Council




Joined: 11/30/2010
Posts: 466
There are two types of school boards. There are ones that use SCH protocol, which basically means you find your own placement then report back to the practicum office at Queen's. Others use EDU protocol, which means that the practicum office will do all the dirty work for you (in which case you should NOT talk to any principals or teachers ahead of time...this may be seen as a breach of protocol).

As for where you do your placement, as long as it's in an Ontario school board it's all good. I have a friend doing her placement in Windsor and it's going just fine. Hamilton would be perfect!

EDIT: I forgot to mention that in final year (i.e. your 5th year at Queen's), there are less options for school boards. Queen's has agreements with only certain school boards for those placements, and I don't think they extend quite as far as Hamilton. That said, you would be able to get Kingston placements and perhaps Peel placements that you could easily access if you had a car or maybe even by GO transit.
Queen's-Trent Concurrent Education, '14 (Trent B.Sc) and '15 (Queen's B.Ed)
jennyt
#39 Posted : Saturday, March 10, 2012 1:30:00 AM
Rank: Frosh


Joined: 11/1/2011
Posts: 5
Thank you for answering my questions!

I hope to teach in a specific area after graduation but I'm not sure if the locations of my teaching placements affect this. I suspect that being familiarized and gaining experience in school boards where I want to teach gives me an advantage for my long-term goal. It's great to know that I would be able to have placements in places near Hamilton until the last year at Queen's, though!

However, I'm concerned with the lack of financial support/awards/scholarships from Queen's compared to some other schools. I was accepted into Trent (expecting my marks to be eligible for free tuition), Brock, and I'm waiting on my U of T acceptance. I like the idea of Brock and U of T because it's closer to home and Brock provides a lot of financial support. However, I also I like the idea of Queen's because I feel very accomplished for being accepted, and I know Queen's is highly-raved for Education. In your opinion, do you think the prestige that people associate with Queen's makes it easier to get a job?

Thanks very much for taking the time to answer my questions!
Omok
#40 Posted : Saturday, March 10, 2012 1:30:04 AM
Rank: Senior Student




Joined: 3/7/2011
Posts: 74
In addition to Baba's post:

SCH placements: Your deadline to arrange is in like, March.
EDU placements (Practicum office places you): Your dead line is like December 16th.

For Queen's con-ed: This year, I got my ONLINE forms to apply for PRAC in Mid-OCT. (I did it with TDSB, and it was EDU. For the bigger boards, they're generally EDU.)

But:

- You don't actually have to stay within ontario (but the process is some-what more complicated, I just know you have the option of doing it at other provinces, you'll have to e-mail the office directly to find out the details).
- In upper years, I've heard this a few days ago (unconfirmed), but it seems like you can even have the option of doing your PRAC abroad?


i'm Just thikning someone's bound to ask this:

Can you go and study aboard while being in Con-ed?

yes. Because we only have education courses for 3/4 years (During our normal stream of bachelors), therefore, in that extra year (which you can arrange around) -- you can go aboard.
Queen's Con-current Education. =)
4 Pages <1234>
Conversation Jump  

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2014, Yet Another Forum.NET
Copyright © 2003-2014 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.
Copyright © 1998-2014 StudentAwards All rights reserved.